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Thread: Lr ?

  1. Lr ?

    OK, LR divas...I'm still playing with my free trial...I have yet again another silly question. My photos look great in LR, then I export them to PSE and save for web as a JPEG...when I upload the photos to my blog they are much darker than they looked in LR and PSE...any advice???
    Sara from MN
    my everyday ramblings blog
    My Camera: Rebel XT
    My Lenses: the kit, 50 f1.8, 17-50 f2.8
    The Fun Stuff: PSE4...testing the trial of LR!

  2. Check the color profile. I work in Adobe RGB, but when I save for the web, I first convert the file to the sRGB color profile.

    Go to Edit > Color Settings and make sure that you don't have it set to always save in Adobe RGB. This can cause colors to look different in a gallery upload (but you WILL want that profile if you're printing at home).
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Cassie



    My Gear: Nikon D300s w/18-200mm VR & 50mm 1.4
    Software: Adobe Photoshop CS4, PSE 10, Lightroom 2


  3. Cassie, thanks a bunch! Do I need that setting if I upload to have them printed??? I rarely print at home. You are a wealth of info!
    Sara from MN
    my everyday ramblings blog
    My Camera: Rebel XT
    My Lenses: the kit, 50 f1.8, 17-50 f2.8
    The Fun Stuff: PSE4...testing the trial of LR!

  4. It depends on where you print. I embed the Adobe RGB profile for printing with Shutterfly, White House Custom Color, and at home. You'd need to check with the printing company.

    ETA: that sounded blunt. What I mean is, some online printers have specifications for color profiles. Usually, though, you would want to just use that Adobe RGB profile. When you save a file in PS, it give you the option to "embed color profile" at the bottom of the dialog box. Just make sure that box is checked.
    Cassie



    My Gear: Nikon D300s w/18-200mm VR & 50mm 1.4
    Software: Adobe Photoshop CS4, PSE 10, Lightroom 2


  5. #5
    I've found that some sites that can "handle" Adobe RGB 1998 color profile still do a better job when they are sent sRGB files. Examples are dotphoto and my local Costco. Basically: www.dotphoto.com can print your photos even if they have the Adobe Color profile embedded, but the colors tend towards the greenish/yellowish side - not enough to say "wow, that looks green" but enough to think "these photos are kind of dull."

    Other local places, like Wolf/Ritz, CANNOT handle Adobe RGB files. The print machines they use just cannot really "understand" an aRGB file, and will do much better with sRGB. When they print a photo that has the embedded Adobe RGB 1998 profile, the pictures are EXTREMELY green! Even if you ask them to "turn off" their automatic color editing, the photos are not that great.

    However, at home, when I control things, Adobe RGB prints out with amazingly better/more vivid color than sRGB.

    To make matters more confusing, some of the clerks at local places do not understand the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB and cannot tell you why your photos look green (if in fact they do.)

    Here's an example of how a local Wolf/Ritz camera printed a .jpg file that had the Adobe RGB 1998 profile isntead of the sRGB profile. (I accidentally forgot to convert a client's photos from Adobe RGB to sRGB, and they took them to a local lab and got very green prints! I was very embarrassed and had to give them a new disc with sRGB files.)

    Jennifer
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    I have Epson printers and am still learning how to use the 2400. So Cassie, do I have it right that I should save anything to print on it with the Adobe RGB option? Then when I print what do I tell the printer? anything? or just leave it at defaults.

    Really, you should set up a consulting business on the web, woman!
    just call me Uma

    I guess I SHOULD remove the blinkie.
    BUT I'm not gonna!


    Retired Creative Team Member and always family


  7. Patricia, do you own Scott Kelby's Photoshop CS2 Book for Digital Photographers? (or the CS3 book, if there is one)

    He goes through the exact steps for setting everything up to print properly, and he uses the Epson printer line, so it's very easy to follow.

    Basically, I use the Adobe RGB profile, I tell the printer to let Photoshop determine the colors, "No Color Correction" and print with the downloaded profiles from Epson for the specific paper I'm using. It sounds confusing, but it's not.

    Check Amber's Post #5 on this thread. She gives the info from the book there.
    Cassie



    My Gear: Nikon D300s w/18-200mm VR & 50mm 1.4
    Software: Adobe Photoshop CS4, PSE 10, Lightroom 2


  8. #8
    Dang, girl. Thanks. yes, I have Kelby's CS3 for Digital Photographers. Sitting across the room on my table. Off to it. THANK YOU.

    The brilliant leading the blind....
    just call me Uma

    I guess I SHOULD remove the blinkie.
    BUT I'm not gonna!


    Retired Creative Team Member and always family


  9. Jennifer, I had this same color problem at Costco. I have been using the sRGB profile and having fewer issues. I also sent them photographs and made sure the color correction was OFF, but they came out too dark. I am finding that in Lightroom, the photograph will look GREAT, but when I export it and print it, it gets much darker and flatter. I found that by taking the photos from Lightroom into Photoshop, and using the View>Proof Setup>Monitor RGB, then using View>Proof Colors, it looks on the monitor what it has been looking like when Costco prints them out. So now I'm adjusting the curves in Photoshop until it looks right, and then uploading them to Costco, and making sure they have the color correction OFF again. It came out MUCH better that way.
    This may be the hard way to do it, but it's working at least--until I get a day or so to read their printer profile instructions. LOL!

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