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Thread: Shooting in RAW?

  1. #1

    Shooting in RAW?

    Does anyone shoot in RAW? I'm going to do some tutorials to learn a bit more about it but I am wondering if it is worth the extra work processing? Does it make such a difference in photos for the average family photos? I can understand if you are doing paid work or something like a wedding perhaps, but just curious about how many of you shoot in JPG or RAW.

    Thanks!
    Sarah



    My Gear: very old Canon EOS XS
    Software: Photoshop, Lightroom CC, ACDSee16

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I don't Sarah, but I will be anxious to read what everyone has to say on this topic. I'm starting my first class with Katrina Kennedy tomorrow.

  3. I have been playing with shooting RAW and it really does make a difference and doesn't take that much more time once you do it a few times. It is amazing how much more control you have over your photo--
    Also- don't know if you know this but if you use Bridge you can edit your JPEG photos in RAW (file- edit in camera raw) The end result isn't quite the same as shooting in RAW, but it definitely makes a better photo.You might play with this and see what you think!
    Hope this helps!

  4. #4
    just do it once. and you will see that it makes so much sense. i heard that some cameras do shoot jpeg and raw at the same time. use this if you want to try first. it took me a while to find out how to use adobe camera raw (acr) so that the photos look great. but if you take a course this might be easier.
    i wouldn't want to shoot without it anymore.
    alina
    ~~~~~~~~~
    laptop hp pavilion g with 2nd monitor, pse 10, lightroom 3, acdsee 14
    camera: samsung galaxy I and canon 600d (rebel T3i), lenses: canon EF 50 mm 1:1.8 II, canon EFS 18-55 mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS II

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    A rural city in Victoria, Australia
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    I've been shooting in jpg + raw for a couple of years. I only used the raw files when I was not happy with the color cast or exposure of the jpg. I usually deleted most of the raw files. I've now watched enough tutorials on workflow in LightRoom and I think I can be more efficient processing ALL my images as raw files in LR. It has features that allow me to compare images and pick the ones to keep and delete, and other features to copy the processing from one photo to a whole batch of others. I'm now on the verge of shooting raw only. I'll probably still export the edited photos as jpgs and still have two copies of every photo! I only backup the jpgs.
    Camera: Canon 7D and Olympus TG2 (point and shoot)
    Lenses: Tamron F2.8 28-75mm, Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 and Sigma 50mm f/1.4
    Software: CS6.0, LightRoom 5, ACDSee 14
    Platform: PC
    My blog: snippets

  6. #6
    I always shoot in RAW - it gives you much more control when processing especially with regard to white balance. I always feel my images are sharper and pop more! I always run my pictures through LR3 before printing or scrapping. I like to add presets in LR too. Give it a whirl (but just make sure you have enough storage!!)
    Georgina
    My camera: Canon 5D Mark II
    Lenses: 50mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8
    Software: PSE 7 and Lightroom 3.7

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
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    I just started last week. I am liking it so far. There is more control for sure on your photos. I take a lot of shots when trying to learn a new concept and one thing I don't like is that once they are transfered onto my hard drive I can't see which ones I like unless I import them all into Lightroom first .With jpegs I would put them in my hard drive and look at my faves and delete the rejects there before I imported into Lightroom to process.
    Jeannie
    My gear:
    Canon 7D , Canon Rebel XSi. Lens: Tamron 28-75 2.8 / Canon 50mm 1.8 /Macro 90mm 2.8 / Canon 55-250mm 4.5 / PSE 8/ Lightroom 3

  8. #8
    I've been shooting in RAW only for several years now. I love the editing control and wouldn't have it any other way! The only time I would shoot in jpeg would be if I had lots of photos that I planned to share, since the editing process can be long, and jpegs are easier.

    Jeannie, I don't have the problem you're describing, but I don't use Lightroom. I upload into my Pictures folder where I can delete the photos I don't want, then I process them in Adobe Camera Raw in Bridge.
    Amy

    my gallery

    My stuff: Nikon D700; Nikkor f2.8 24-70mm, f2.8 105mm, and f1.4 50 mm lenses; Tamron f2.8 70-200; Photoshop CC, Lightroom, iMac, MacBook


  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Yes, the one drawback is that it's hard to skip through your raw files before you start sorting them in Lightroom. The files are large and many photoviewers don't show previews of raw files. I have ACDSee15 and IrfanView both of which will display raw files, but it is still slower to display than jpgs. However I prefer doing my cull in LR because when you zoom in you can flip between photos at that zoom to compare them and choose which is in focus (if any! ) and you can display them side by side for more comparison. Then you can quickly flag them as Pick "P" or reject "X" without actually deleting them (I always like to reserve the right to change my mind!).
    Camera: Canon 7D and Olympus TG2 (point and shoot)
    Lenses: Tamron F2.8 28-75mm, Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 and Sigma 50mm f/1.4
    Software: CS6.0, LightRoom 5, ACDSee 14
    Platform: PC
    My blog: snippets

  10. #10
    Only shoot in raw here. Does not take long to process in lightroom once you get into a workflow routine.
    Carolyn

    Blog: House of Amson

    My Camera: Nikon D300
    Lenses Include: Nikon 18-200, Nikon 50 mm 1.8 and 1.4, Tokina Macro 100mm 2.8, Tokina 11-16mm 2.8 (newest indulgence)

  11. #11
    Raw is the only way to go. Now if they can make a good point and shoot with Raw, I would have the best of both worlds.
    Wendy


  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Cary (Raleigh), NC
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    My Fuji ZLR (point and shoot) shot in RAW but I didn't even know what it was until I bought my Sony dSLR.

    I used to shoot in RAW. Then we went on a vacation where I wouldn't be able to unload my photos so I switched to JPEG. I also got out of the habit of taking photos for other people. I always shot in RAW when I did Christmas card photos, weddings, etc. For me, I just don't care anymore. Especially since I do most of my photography outside now.

    Now, with a new Windows 8 computer and PSE 10 (I had 6 for years), I am not sure how to set up my workflow to sort and edit RAW files. I can't afford Lightroom and am really not interested in using it.

    Just now, I opened a folder from November and realized I have 300+ RAW files I've never even looked at. The one plus to Windows 8 is I get a RAW thumbnail preview, but the downside---I don't know which are RAW and which are JPEG!
    Sarah
    Equipment: Canon T2i (550D) with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 55-250mm f/4-5.6, 50mm f/1.8, and 400mm f/5.6L lenses
    Software: Windows 8, PSE 10 (Editor), PSE 6 (Organizer), and PSCS 4

  13. Raw (95% of the time) for me, too. Lightroom makes it fairly quick to edit and convert to jpeg. I've been amazed at some of the photos I've been able to save because it was in raw.
    ~Karen~

    My gear: imac, CS5, Nikon D90, 35mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Cary (Raleigh), NC
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    Sarah, here's a link to a thread from three years ago with the photo that convinced me shooting in raw was a pretty good idea. It wasn't a wedding or a photo that was even important, but I liked it and I hate the idea of losing a good photo because I am not good enough at settings.

    http://www.designerdigitals.com/digi...33&postcount=2

    Scroll to the bottom of my post to see the comparison. Prairie dog on left, after processing. Prairie dog on right, SOOC. It can potentially make a huge difference. I find that often, when I know I am shooting in raw, I will slightly underexpose knowing I can fix it in post.
    Sarah
    Equipment: Canon T2i (550D) with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 55-250mm f/4-5.6, 50mm f/1.8, and 400mm f/5.6L lenses
    Software: Windows 8, PSE 10 (Editor), PSE 6 (Organizer), and PSCS 4

  15. jpg. For what I do, it's enough. BUT once I'm done organizing all my photos and have started figuring out lightroom...I will definitely be tempted to go to raw.

  16. #16
    Thanks everyone for the feedback. I am definitely going to start to do some photos in RAW until I get a workflow figured out. I think that my layouts are going to have to start to be a bit simpler though or it is going to take me half a day to do a page between photo edits and page edits!!
    Sarah



    My Gear: very old Canon EOS XS
    Software: Photoshop, Lightroom CC, ACDSee16

  17. #17
    When I got my first sorry a few years ago I started shooting raw and haven't looked back!! There were do many articles online suggesting how much better it was, so I didn't think twice!

    My Camera - Canon 5D Mark II
    My Lenses - 24-70mm f/2.8, 50 mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8
    My Software - Photoshop CC, Lightroom 5, ACDSee 17

  18. #18
    another raw shooter here It's amazing how much more you can do to your photos!
    Anke




    My gear:
    Nikon: D700, 50mm 1.4, 24-70 mm 2.8, 17-35 mm 2.8, 70-200 2.8, 85mm 1.4
    Tamron:18-270mm 3.5-6.3, 90mm 2.8,
    LR 5 (CC), CS6 on a 17" MacBookPro.
    Member NAPP
    My blog
    My gallery

  19. Quote Originally Posted by Jean2 View Post
    one thing I don't like is that once they are transfered onto my hard drive I can't see which ones I like unless I import them all into Lightroom first .With jpegs I would put them in my hard drive and look at my faves and delete the rejects there before I imported into Lightroom to process.
    I'm curious, Jeannie, why you do it this way. I shoot RAW, then I import them straight into LR. I view them immediately, reject them using "x", then delete them. I choose the option that not only deletes them from the LR catalog, but deletes them from my hard drive.
    kelly
    Louisburg, KS

    my blog

  20. Yep, 100% RAW shooter here.

    In fact, I get annoyed now when I try to edit a jpg that I've got from my iphone. I just can't edit it as much as I want.
    kelly
    Louisburg, KS

    my blog

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Manitoba, Canada
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    8,863
    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly Buss View Post
    I'm curious, Jeannie, why you do it this way. I shoot RAW, then I import them straight into LR. I view them immediately, reject them using "x", then delete them. I choose the option that not only deletes them from the LR catalog, but deletes them from my hard drive.
    I didn't know I could delete them from my hard drive from in Lightroom. I will be doing that from now on... Thanks Kelly!
    Jeannie
    My gear:
    Canon 7D , Canon Rebel XSi. Lens: Tamron 28-75 2.8 / Canon 50mm 1.8 /Macro 90mm 2.8 / Canon 55-250mm 4.5 / PSE 8/ Lightroom 3

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
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    Yes! In fact I just discovered that if I'm forgetful and don't delete the rejects as I go, it is easy later on to hunt for ALL the rejects in my catalog and delete them all at once!
    Camera: Canon 7D and Olympus TG2 (point and shoot)
    Lenses: Tamron F2.8 28-75mm, Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 and Sigma 50mm f/1.4
    Software: CS6.0, LightRoom 5, ACDSee 14
    Platform: PC
    My blog: snippets

  23. #23
    You girls are inspiring me to get my files cleaned up. I have been shooting in RAW for a while, but I have not been deleting the rejects. I really need to take care of that so that I'll have more room on my computer!
    Amy Mallory


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