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Thread: extension tubes?

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  1. extension tubes?

    Anyone have any experience with these?

    I always use autofocus, but when I try one of these with my lens, it doesn't focus. Is there a particular size lens I should use?

    In case it wasn't clear, I'm totally clueless here; so any insight would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I dont use them, my father did/does use old ones, will ask him later, I thought you HAD to manual focus with them?
    read all about it!... -->http://britgirl.typepad.co.uk/
    My DD gallery!
    I use; CS6 and LR5 on my beloved iMac!
    I'm a Canon girl I have a 5D MRK II.


  3. Katrina Kennedy has taken GORGEOUS photos with extension tubes. Hopefully, she'll see this and respond.

    The biggest tip I remember her giving was lots of good light is needed when using them.

    Let us know what you find out!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Mama Du View Post
    Katrina Kennedy has taken GORGEOUS photos with extension tubes. Hopefully, she'll see this and respond.

    The biggest tip I remember her giving was lots of good light is needed when using them.

    Let us know what you find out!
    Thanks

    I do all of my macro work with Kenko DG Extension Tubes. They are listed on Amazon right now for $167. That's about $10 more than the price I paid a year ago.

    The set comes with three lengths - 12mm, 20mm, 36mm, and can be used separately or in different combinations. There are no optics in the tube so they are light when added to a lens. I prefer to use them with my 70-200 lens, but I like the light I have when using them with the 50mm 1.4.

    My lens can still auto focus as long as the extensions are put on in the right order. (Place the extension on the lens and then the entire thing on the camera.)

    It is a bit of a process to find focus for a shot when using them, but once you get the hang of the difference in your focal distance they are fun. I find myself holding my breath a lot when I shoot with them.

    Their quality is as good as the lens I'm using, which is a nice tradeoff given the price difference of a macro lens.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Kennewick, Washington
    Posts
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    I got a set after seeing Katrina's awesome work with them. At first I had a hard time focusing, I was amazed how close I needed to get. Once I figured it out, it was all good. They were alot of fun.
    Carol

    my gallery

    my flickr

    Gear: Canon 5D Mark III, 50 mm f/1.2L, 24-70 mm f/2.8L, 70-200 mm f/2.8L IS, 100mm f/2.8L macro IS
    Software: Lightroom / CS5

  6. #6
    I'd love to know this too! I've been itching to do some macro, but don't have the $$ for a new lens.
    ~Karen~

    My gear: imac, CS5, Nikon D90, 35mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8.

  7. #7
    I'm totally in the dark. What are they and what are they used for?
    Terry



    Terry's Tales



    Gear: Nikon D60
    Software: CS4
    Platform: Mac

  8. #8
    Terry, they look like hollow lenses. They attach to the camera, between the lens and the body to shorten the focusing distance between your lens and your subject. This allows you to achieve a macro shot without buying a macro lens.

  9. #9
    I'm with Katrina, the trick is to hold your breath. lol I do this with almost every shot I take. :O)

    I think these tubes are wonderful. When I first started using them they would do the auto focus thing, but I found I got better shots if I put it on manual, set the little line in the middle for the correct speed (I'm so sorry, Katrina for not knowing the correct names, eek) and then zoomed in and out with my body until what I wanted was in focus. I also found that they worked better with my 50mm lens than my zoom lens.

    (Now I need to go get Katrina's tutorial out so that I'll know the right terminology) heaven help me.
    ~Kelly




  10. #10
    thanks for the explanation Katrina.

    Kelly--you are cracking me up. Gotta learn that terminology huh. Me too---I think that word though is metering. At least that is the name I gave it.
    Terry



    Terry's Tales



    Gear: Nikon D60
    Software: CS4
    Platform: Mac

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by MIDA78466 View Post
    thanks for the explanation Katrina.

    Kelly--I think that word though is metering. At least that is the name I gave it.
    YES! Metering, that's what I meant to say. I've learned so much from Katrina, but pop quizzes were never my strong point. Thanks, Terry.
    ~Kelly




  12. Ok, so now you gals are making me want these extension tubes...
    kelly
    Louisburg, KS

    my blog

  13. #13
    Ditto!

    Was going to save up for a macro lens, but this would be an awesome option!!
    My name is Krysta, and I'm a switcher.. finally on a MAC!

  14. I'm so glad this topic has come up as I was going to ask about it. I got some extension tubes nearly a year ago but so far haven't got on very well with them. I've tried them on auto and manual focus but just cannot get the focus sharp. I'll try holding my breath next time! I've got a Nikon D60 with the kit lens of 18-55 and a telephoto of 70-300. Even with just normal shots I tend to get a bit of shake with the longer lens.
    I would really love to get the hang of macro. Katrina, when you say it's important to put them on in the right order do you mean the smallest one next to the camera body? Is it better to try them one at a time or in combination? By putting more than one on does it just increase the magnification?
    Thanks, Kate

  15. #15
    I got a set shortly after Kelly... her photos sold me... I had fun for awhile but then photography took a back burner to life... just got them out again to play with. Definitely are fun and a nice investment if a lens isn't in the budget. And yes... definitely hold your breath while doing the metering dance Kelly was describing...



  16. #16
    The order needs to be extension added to the lens first and then attach to camera. On most cameras, dependent on the brand of extension tubes, you will still be able to auto focus. I do find that manual focusing often works best with macro work though.

    An additional extension tube allows you to get closer to your subject to be able to achieve focus, so yes, in a sense it is increasing magnification. Technically that is not what is really happening though as the extension tubes have no optics.

    With macro it is REALLY important to have plenty of light.

    The spot for focus really can be the difference of about a 1/4" or less.

    Play with closing your aperture down as well (a larger f/#) to get a bit more in focus than shooting wide open (a small f/#) provides. You can also play with using your tripod, if your subject really works with it.

    Looking forward to seeing what you create Kate!

  17. Thanks Katrina, I practised a bit today and out of about 20 photos only 2 are really usable. I've put one up as my photo of the day: 060211 scary looking weed! 37/365 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
    I think part of the problem is judging how near I can get. I couldn't get autofocus to work at all so tried holding my breath on manual! I've got the Kenko DG set and just used the larger 36mm with the 18-55 lens. I'll go on trying different combinations and see if I can perfect the technique.
    Kate

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